The 10 Most Effective Law Firm Marketing Techniques:Part 2

The 10 Most Effective Law Firm Marketing Techniques:Part 2

February 11, 2016

It's not real until you write it down


Carrying on form yesterdays marketing tips listed below are 6-10.

Number six: Get active in a trade association, and get on the board of directors. You’ll notice that I said, trade association, and not bar association. You should join an association of clients. You want to get in front of a room full of clients, people who can potentially hire you. You find out about these trade associations by asking your current clients what meetings they go to. Then it’s a simple matter of saying, “I’d like to join you at the meeting. Would you introduce me to your friends?” These friends, of course, are all potential clients for you. It’s no good just going to the meeting; you have to be visible. Your goal when you join a trade association is not to be just a face in the crowd. Your goal is to get on the board of directors. The way you do that is you seek out the president and you volunteer. You volunteer to help put together programs; you volunteer to help with the newsletter; you volunteer to help in any sort of activity that is going to lead to a board position.

Number seven: Only after you’ve done all of these things, then pursue target clients. What I mean by “target” is a business executive whom you already know. You don’t have to make any cold calls. Whom you’re contacting could be a neighbor. It could be another dad or mom at a little league game. I originated a Fortune 500 company by just talking to another dad at a little league game and asking him what line of work he was in and what kind of business problems he faced. You can meet targets in the religious organizations that you go to and the clubs that you belong to and the charities that you’re active in – these are all people who have businesses – that’s what you looking for – and they all have careers. Ask them questions about it.

Number eight: If you do have a business plan, write it down. It’s not real until you write it down. What you want to be writing down is whom you’re going to call, when you’re going to meet them, and some sort of an outcome that you’re expecting to have. The idea of writing it down is now you’ve moved it on to your calendar. Once it’s on your to-do list, you’re going to do it.

Number nine: A question I get a lot is “How much time should I devote to business development?” Point number nine is I would recommend 200 hours a year. That may sound like a lot, but when you break it down by week, it’s really only four hours a week. You can meet somebody for coffee at Starbucks in the morning. You can meet a client. You can meet a referral source for lunch. You can go to a trade association meeting in the evening. All of this you can weave into your ordinary to-do list, and before you know it, you’ve devoted 400 hours. I guarantee you are going to get way more back in new business and new clients than the value of the effort that you devoted.

My closing point, number ten, is to track your results. If you are undertaking a marketing initiative such as, “joining the local business owners club, make a point of writing down the people that you want to meet before you go. After you’ve met your targets, asked them about their business challenges, later you can to go back and ask yourself, “Did this work? Did I get a new file?” I recall working with a lawyer who was spending money on radio ads, and he was reaching a huge number of people, but he examined his new clients and none of them came from the radio. He wasn’t getting any new business out of it at all, so he discontinued it. That’s the approach you have to make, but you only will be able to do that if you track your results.

So count to ten, pick the ideas you will pursue, and just do it. The more activities you choose, the more clients and revenue you’ll bring in.

If you found these tips useful you can read the full article by Larry Bodine here